ED6: Damaged Intelligence – COVER REVEAL!

Cover reveal time! The sixth installment of the Empire Dance series is sat on the launch pads, nose pointed at the stars, ready to go – and yes, there will be pre-order links soon!

But first…

Print

That’s CAS Special Agent Kit Nagoya there, diving through clouds of shattered glass as ne pursues nir target, the fugitive Captain Kelly. A lovely, punchy cover, wrangled by An Amazing Egg. Just like the other books in the series, Damaged Intelligence will be available immediately on launch through Kindle Unlimited.

When? Oh, I was thinking perhaps the beginning of May…

On the Gemmell Awards

Everything ends.

Over the last decade, the David Gemmell Awards For Fantasy have honoured the best in fantasy fiction and artwork as chosen by the readers. With a roll of honour taking in current genre luminaries such as John Gwynne, Robin Hobb, Mark Lawrence, Peter Newman, Brandon Sanderson, Andrezj Sapkowski, Brent Weeks and many more, with all of these winners chosen by a public vote, the awards have brought focus to some of the most exciting books, authors and artists in recent times.

Unfortunately, after ten years, the Gemmell Awards will draw to a close with immediate effect. With a lack of suitable volunteers to take on current committee roles, and insufficient manpower to deliver the wide range of tasks involved, the present team has been left with no choice but to wind up the awards.

The remaining members of the team would like to thank everyone who has supported the awards, including the publishers that have worked with us, our past committee members and volunteers, all the authors and artists who have offered their support, the events and venues who have hosted our ceremonies, everyone who has ever voted on the awards over the last decade and all the fans who have helped share and spread the word on the awards.

Departing Gemmell Awards Chair Stan Nicholls said: ‘This is a decision that has not been taken lightly, and indeed is one that myself and my committee members make with a heavy heart. It was always important to us to do things to a high standard, and in the current situation I don’t think that we could deliver something befitting the reputation the Gemmell Awards has. I hope that the awards will be remembered for the good work they have done in supporting and championing the cause of fantasy fiction over the last ten years, and that we’ve left a legacy behind that people can look at fondly in years to come.’

From a personal point of view, I would like to celebrate the work Stan, Anne Nicholls, Alex Davis, and the rest of the DGLA team have undertaken to bring so much brilliant fantasy to the attention of so many people across the world. As a tribute to David Gemmell’s legacy, the Awards can stand as proud as Dros Delnoch itself. And, like Druss the Legend, the character whose axe Snaga inspired the shape of the original award, the DGLA will surely inspire others to follow in their footsteps.

Everything ends… but not while we remember it.

Book review – The Sub-Genres of British Fantasy Literature

The Sub-Genres of British Fantasy Literature by A.J. DaltonAdam (AJ) Dalton’s slender exegesis is part of his PhD work, serving to help position his own fiction at the forefront of the subgenre of metaphysical fantasy that he coined back in 2008. That subgenre, Dalton claims, is a darker evolution and extension of traditional epic fantasy, reflecting the cynicism and anxieties of the modern world yet still maintaining many of the traditional tropes and never turning as nihilistic as Grimdark. While the heroes and Chosen Ones of metaphysical fantasy may go on quests to save the world, and to discover themselves, they may break both in the process. Unlike traditional epic fantasies, there may not be happy endings, but unlike Grimdark, there is always hope.

The evidence Dalton gathers to support this argument relies on examination of his own books (notably Necromancer’s Gambit and Empire of the Saviours) and contrasts against other leading fantasy literature, as well as the social and historical context of previous subgenres of fantasy. I can’t help feeling that a greater examination of the development and differences between metaphysical fantasy and Grimdark might have been beneficial, given Grimdark’s continued dominance in the field – though as it stands I firmly support Dalton’s assertion that metaphysical fantasy ploughs a more hopeful and optimistic field, since despite the bleakness of the times we still need heroes, even if they are broken ones.

I’m also slightly surprised that Dalton doesn’t focus more on the work of Michael Moorcock, whose conflicted Eternal Champion surely has to be the Golden Age progenitor of metaphysical fantasy, but that is probably an argument for somebody far more scholarly than myself. In effect Dalton has laid the groundwork for a robust discussion of the history and context of British fantasy literature, that I can happily recommend both to fans of the fantastic and to folk who have less familiarity with the genre.

Luna Press Publishing, 2017. ISBN: 9781911143161
Buy it here.

As an endnote, I’m musing as to whether Heir to the North and The High King’s Vengeance would fit into the sub-genre of metaphysical fantasy. Obviously I prefer to describe myself as an Epic Fantasist, but HTTN and HKV certainly fit a few of the definitions of the sub-genre. There is hope, and faith despite all that happens, everything that breaks or is destroyed, and though the end is not happy, it’s definitely not grim. Dalton notes that metaphysical fantasy looks at epic fantasy through a prism of the modern day yet still “tolerates challenge and difference, celebrating subversive humour and the courage to act.”

I prefer that worldview than that of Grimdark, which appears to be the only other available side of the coin as far as fantasy is concerned these days. It’s probably interesting to note too, that I approached Grimbold Books with Heir to the North as a result of finding them recommended on Dalton’s website. There’s a bit of a meta link there, isn’t there?

Let me know: am I metaphysical, or just plain Epic?

Free Review ARCS from Kristell Ink!

Joanne Hall

Kristell Ink are about to release a flurry of new novels and novellas, and if you’re a reviewer or would like to try your hand at reviewing you can pick up review copies NOW!

Sammy says :

We have pretty ARCs and review copies of several of our new and upcoming publications available including:

Blood Bank by Zoë Markham
Mermaid by Kate O’Connor
Children of the Shaman by Jessica Rydill
Empty Skies & Sunlight by Kate Coe

and coming soon (but available now if you don’t mind a rough ARC!) …

Anachronism by Jennifer Lee Rossman
Escaping Firgo by Jason Whittle
The Promise of a Battered Moon by Jack Teng
Gwythias: Door to the Void by Isha Crowe
Scylla & Charbydis by Lindsey Duncan

Get in touch! All we ask is that you give the book(s) a fair and honest review on your blog and/or reading review site of…

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Reviewed by my own book cover

While we’re on the subject of reviews, you can see a piece where Heir to the North is effectively dissected by its own sentient book cover over at Michael R Fletcher’s site¹. No, really, that picture is more than capable of speaking a thousand words. Sometimes, in fact, it’s a struggle to get the damned thing to shut up.

 

 

¹Buy his book.